rdecom

rdecom:

On Tuesday, Lt. Gen. Patricia McQuistion, deputy commanding general, Army Materiel Command (AMC) and Mr. Gabe Camarillo, principal deputy assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology (ASA ALT) along with other leadership from AMC headquarters, TACOM Life Cycle…

pbsamericanmasters
theparisreview:

Yesterday was Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s wedding anniversary. Here’s a passionate, discursive letter she wrote him in the summer of 1930, after her breakdown. “The sheets were always damp. There was Christmas in the echoes, and eternal walks. We cried when we saw the Pope. There were the luminous shadows of the Pinco and the officer’s shining boots.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

Yesterday was Zelda and F. Scott Fitzgerald’s wedding anniversary. Here’s a passionate, discursive letter she wrote him in the summer of 1930, after her breakdown. “The sheets were always damp. There was Christmas in the echoes, and eternal walks. We cried when we saw the Pope. There were the luminous shadows of the Pinco and the officer’s shining boots.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

thecivilwarparlor
thecivilwarparlor:

Civil War Surgeon Mary Walker
Dr. Walker Is The Only Woman Ever Awarded The Congressional Medal Of Honor.
As the Civil War broke out, Dr. Walker traveled to Washington to petition for a commission in the Army as a surgeon. Denied the commission, she served for several months as a contract surgeon. When she Walker was finally appointed assistant surgeon in the Army of the Cumberland, she made herself a slightly modified officer’s uniform that gave her more mobility when treating soldiers and working in field hospitals than women’s clothing of the day.
Dr. Walker was then appointed assistant surgeon of the 52nd Ohio Infantry. She continually crossed Confederate lines to treat civilians. Although she later fought rumors that she was not a qualified doctor, but a Union spy, it is presumed that she passed information during that time. Dr. Walker was taken prisoner in 1864 by Confederate troops and imprisoned in Richmond for four months until she was exchanged, with two dozen other Union doctors, for 17 Confederate surgeons.
In 1917, when criteria for awarding the Congressional Medal of Honor changed, Dr. Walker’s award was rescinded along with more than 900 others. She refused to return it, however, and wore it always. President Jimmy Carter restored the award to her in 1977. As a result of her service to the Union during the Civil War, Mary Walker was paid $766.16 and provided a monthly pension lower than those of most war widows.
http://chnm.gmu.edu/courses/rr/s01/cw/students/leeann/historyandcollections/history/pathbreakers/marywalker.html

That is so not right!  She should be given the respect not only as a woman but her rightful pension. There she has been labled wronglly.

thecivilwarparlor:

Civil War Surgeon Mary Walker

Dr. Walker Is The Only Woman Ever Awarded The Congressional Medal Of Honor.

As the Civil War broke out, Dr. Walker traveled to Washington to petition for a commission in the Army as a surgeon. Denied the commission, she served for several months as a contract surgeon. When she Walker was finally appointed assistant surgeon in the Army of the Cumberland, she made herself a slightly modified officer’s uniform that gave her more mobility when treating soldiers and working in field hospitals than women’s clothing of the day.

Dr. Walker was then appointed assistant surgeon of the 52nd Ohio Infantry. She continually crossed Confederate lines to treat civilians. Although she later fought rumors that she was not a qualified doctor, but a Union spy, it is presumed that she passed information during that time. Dr. Walker was taken prisoner in 1864 by Confederate troops and imprisoned in Richmond for four months until she was exchanged, with two dozen other Union doctors, for 17 Confederate surgeons.

In 1917, when criteria for awarding the Congressional Medal of Honor changed, Dr. Walker’s award was rescinded along with more than 900 others. She refused to return it, however, and wore it always. President Jimmy Carter restored the award to her in 1977. As a result of her service to the Union during the Civil War, Mary Walker was paid $766.16 and provided a monthly pension lower than those of most war widows.

http://chnm.gmu.edu/courses/rr/s01/cw/students/leeann/historyandcollections/history/pathbreakers/marywalker.html

That is so not right!  She should be given the respect not only as a woman but her rightful pension. There she has been labled wronglly.

thecivilwarparlor
thecivilwarparlor:

Hospital Gingerbread- Soldiers Fighting For Food
Gingerbread was a favorite when it was available, and a comfort food often offered to wounded soldiers in field hospitals. One diary entry of a Civil War nurse described how, after spending the day bathing and bandaging soldiers wounds, she found a sutler’s stand and bought a supply of gingerbread which she called “a singular food for sick men.”
However, Mrs. Levins pointed out, the conflict’s food history “was not all about goodness and light. During the war the four items that caused the most food-related fights within the ranks were bread, meat, apples and pickles. Documents record that soldiers were court martialed, beaten almost to death, and even shot over apples as they went foraging. These were desperate times when large numbers of men often lived just this side of starvation for long periods of time.”
Credit To: http://historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews112.shtml

thecivilwarparlor:

Hospital Gingerbread- Soldiers Fighting For Food

Gingerbread was a favorite when it was available, and a comfort food often offered to wounded soldiers in field hospitals. One diary entry of a Civil War nurse described how, after spending the day bathing and bandaging soldiers wounds, she found a sutler’s stand and bought a supply of gingerbread which she called “a singular food for sick men.”

However, Mrs. Levins pointed out, the conflict’s food history “was not all about goodness and light. During the war the four items that caused the most food-related fights within the ranks were bread, meat, apples and pickles. Documents record that soldiers were court martialed, beaten almost to death, and even shot over apples as they went foraging. These were desperate times when large numbers of men often lived just this side of starvation for long periods of time.”

Credit To: http://historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews112.shtml

thecivilwarparlor
thecivilwarparlor:

Anguish And Animosity Of The Civil War Was Literally Recorded In Stone In Some Burial Grounds
Historic GravestonesGravestone of a Union Soldier who had the misfortune of dying in Fredericksburg, Va.,”  Reads:

"They came from the north to our southern land to venge their fire and make their brand. But this lonely, desolate forgotten spot is all this Yankee bastard got. Come not again to feed our soil but leave us alone to our peace and toil. And let this place in remembrance be, a fitting end and a dread to thee."
Photo: The Marietta National Cemetery is home to thousands of Union soldiers from the Civil War. The headstones marking the interment of each of the 10,312 laid to rest here spans most of the 23 acres devoted to the cemetery. 
http://historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews43.shtml
http://www.fstopguy.com/patterns-in-the-headstones/

thecivilwarparlor:

Anguish And Animosity Of The Civil War Was Literally Recorded In Stone In Some Burial Grounds

Historic Gravestones
Gravestone of a Union Soldier who had the misfortune of dying in Fredericksburg, Va.,”  Reads:

  • "They came from the north to our southern land to venge their fire and make their brand. But this lonely, desolate forgotten spot is all this Yankee bastard got. Come not again to feed our soil but leave us alone to our peace and toil. And let this place in remembrance be, a fitting end and a dread to thee."
  • Photo: The Marietta National Cemetery is home to thousands of Union soldiers from the Civil War. The headstones marking the interment of each of the 10,312 laid to rest here spans most of the 23 acres devoted to the cemetery. 

http://historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews43.shtml

http://www.fstopguy.com/patterns-in-the-headstones/